Gordon Freedman is President of the National Laboratory for Education Transformation (www.NLET.org), a California-based 501(c)(3) non-profit committed to transforming 20th century education into 21st century learning. Freedman’s film and television credits are found on IMDB. He is a featured panelist at our upcoming event, The Classroom of Tomorrow Virtual Summit.

When I was invited by Kaltura to join a five-person panel on the Classroom of the Future, I had an immediate and visceral reaction. Who can say that there will be classrooms in the future? But I do know for sure that there will be video. But how will we get it beyond its infancy?

While we patiently wait for the flying cars, can someone please innovate with video for learning, education and training? Humans are first and foremost visual processors. The largest part of our brain is devoted to sight and the associated senses of hearing and symbol usage rely on circuits in the occipital area of our brains. Our imaginations, and our conceiving and learning of new concepts, rely on visualizing in our brains things we cannot see in real life, using this same circuitry.

Ever since film, television and video came on the scene they were experimented with for education, training and learning. Generally, this meant projecting people speaking in a classroom or online giving a lecture. Or it meant video clips augmenting a primary text and a few static visuals. In all the years since managing video online has gotten easier, the creativity and connectivity of video has not been significantly improved for teaching and learning.

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Interested in hearing more? It’s not too late to register for The Classroom of Tomorrow Virtual Summit on June 8!

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